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What To Do If You Have A Broken Toe

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Overview

A broken toe will be sore, inflamed and red. There might be bruising of the skin around the area and occasionally a gathering of blood underneath the toenail. You’ll find it hard to walk and wearing a shoe will be tricky. If the break is severe, the toe might stick out at an angle. Most broken toes can be treated at home and medical assistance might not be required.

When to Visit your GP

A broken toe will be sore, inflamed and red. There might be bruising of the skin around the area and occasionally a gathering of blood underneath the toenail.

A broken toe will be sore, inflamed and red. There might be bruising of the skin around the area and occasionally a gathering of blood underneath the toenail.

Examine the toe every day and phone your GP if:

  • The pain worsens or isn’t relieved by painkillers – your GP might be able to recommend a stronger sedative.
  • The inflammation or bruising doesn’t recover after a few days.
  • You have a wound adjoining the injured toe, which will require cleansing to avoid infection.

Going To Hospital

Go to your nearby emergency department if:

  • Your toes are emotionless and numb or burning (you might have injured the nerves).
  • The skin surrounding the toe is blue or purple.
  • You’ve severely damaged the toe – for instance, if the toe is twisted at an angle or has an open wound.

Home Treatment For A Broken Toe

The subsequent guidelines can be used to treat a broken toe at home.

  • For little toes, place a bit of cotton wool or gauze between your damaged toe and the one next to it and bind the two toes with a plaster. The healthy toe will support the damaged toe.
  • Using a shoe with a firm sole or a surgical cast shoe will aid your movement.
  • Keep your foot elevated for as long as you can, for instance by resting your feet on pillows. This will help decrease inflammation and pain.
  • Take over-the-counter sedatives such as ibuprofen to release the pain, but don’t give aspirin to any kids that are below the age of 16.
  • Wear tough shoes that don’t compress or curve the toe.

Related Video On A Broken Toe

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